Trust in you

Doing VR for the first time can be daunting for many reasons. A new user puts a lot of trust in you as the facilitator, and this is an important responsibility.

In this section we will look at fears to ease, and how to ease them

Fears to ease

  • Being put in something scary (or triggering).
  • Tripping over or getting hurt
  • The unknown – new technology
  • Looking silly, doing something embarrassing, ending up on YouTube
  • Being vulnerable

Being put in something scary (or triggering).

This can be eased by explaining what you will be showing them, and making sure they have as much control over their own experience as possible.

Giving them a quick run-through. Explaining that it will be a safe experience, and if they feel uncomfortable at any point they can take the headset off or ask for assistance.

Tripping over or getting hurt

Show the user the room you have set up for them, and explain that the system knows where the trip hazards’ are (via the guardian wall). That the system will bring up a blue grid wall when they are approaching a trip hazard, and keep them safe.

The unknown – new technology

For many people, technology is a scary thing. From watching sci-fi horror, or YouTube videos it can send the imagination wild.

Having a calming voice, relaxed body language and showing that you care about the users safety can go a long way.

Give them control of their own experience. Demonstrate on your own head, how to take the headset off.

I always strongly encourage a user to use the VR, but avoid pressuring the user to do anything they do not want to.

Looking silly, doing something embarrassing, ending up on YouTube

  • Give the user the option to withdraw from all recording.
  • Give them a safe / private space to do VR in.
  • Reassure the user they are safe.

Being vulnerable

Taking the step to be vulnerable for many is a challenging thing to do.

It can be important to recognize this vulnerability the user is putting themselves in, and honour it.

Doing all the tips above will contribute to this

Give them control of their own experience.

  • Let them decide if they want to do it.
  • Demonstrate how to take off the headset
  • Set up a physically and psychologically safe space
  • Provide an overview of the experience.
  • Give the user the option to withdraw from all recording.
  • Reassure the user they are safe.
  • Having a calming voice, relaxed body language and showing that you care about the users safety.